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COURSES

RELG 132.  Survey of the New Testament, Fall 2012 semester, MWF 8 a.m. and MWF 10 a.m.

 Texts for the course are the Stephen L. Harris, The New Testament: A Student’s Introduction (2011), and a copy of the Bible.  In class, most students will be reading from The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version.  The texts are available in the Emory & Henry College bookstore and may also be ordered online at Amazon.com.  

RELG 132 provides basic knowledge of the literature, thought, and historical setting of the New Testament.  Upon completion of the course, students should be able to identify important characters and historical events of the New Testament and to repeat significant Bible stories.  The course introduces students to a historical-reflective approach to the study of the New Testament and the Christian faith.  Upon completion of the course, students should know the principal messages contained in the New Testament writings and understand how those messages arose within particular historical contexts.  Students should be familiar with the history of canonization and source criticism.  In general, students should understand the process by which the Bible became the Bible.  Students should have a basic understanding of the historical-critical approach to Biblical texts, form-criticism, redaction criticism, and literary criticism.  The course also helps students improve as interpreters and communicators of ideas through in-class discussions, a research paper option, and occasional written assignments and the essay portions of exams.  Although not the explicit focus of this course, class discussion will not avoid questions regarding how the message of the Bible is relevant to modern life.

MOODLEStudents enrolled in RELG 132 should visit Moodle for the course syllabus, assignments, review materials, and discussions.  For general information about Moodle, how it works, the site’s structure and pedagogical philosophy, visit Moodle’s homepage.  For on-campus support, contact Emory & Henry College’s Information Technology Help Desk at 276.944.6881.

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RELG 201.  Religious Individuals Who Changed History, Fall 2012 semester, TTH 11:00 a.m.

Texts for the course are Denise and John Carmody’s In the Path of the Masters; Cyrus B. Dawsey,Jr.’s Living Waters; Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? ; and Mary S. Poplin’s Finding Calcutta: What Mother Teresa Taught Me About Meaningful Life and Service.

RELG 201 examines the cultural influence of religious figures.  The first part of the course concentrates on the founders of the major world religions.  Emphasis is placed on understanding Siddhartha Gautama, Confucius, Moses and the Israelite Prophets, Jesus of Nazareth, and Muhammad within the context of their times.  Attention is given to moments of friction with the establishments of their days and to the social changes that followed.  The second part explores the missionaries and institutionalizers of
Christianity, including some of the Church reformers and denominational founders.  The religious
people studied include Paul, Origen, Athanasius, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Francis of Assisi, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Queen Isabella, and John Wesley. Again, emphasis is placed on the way these men and women shaped culture and changed history.  The third part of
the course examines the cultural influence of twentieth century religious social reformers
such as Mahatma Gandhi, Pope John xxiii, Martin Luther King, Jr., Oscar Romero,
Ayatollah Khoumeni, and Mother Teresa of Calcutta.

MOODLE.  Students enrolled in RELG 201 should visit Moodle for the course syllabus, assignments, review materials, and discussions.  For general information about Moodle, how it works, the site’s structure and pedagogical philosophy, visit Moodle’s homepage.  For on-campus support, contact Emory & Henry College’s Information Technology Help Desk at 276.944.6881

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ETLA 401.  Connections: Christians and Social Justice, Fall 2012 semester, MWF 11:00 a.m.

Texts for the course are Robert McAfee Brown’s Liberation Theology: An Introductory Guide; Robert V. Andelson and James M. Dawsey’s From Wasteland to Promised Land: Liberation Theology for a Post-Marxist World; Adam Hochschild’s King Leopold’s Ghost:  A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa, Jean H. Baker’s Sisters: The Lives of American Suffragists; and Jimmy Creech’s Adam’s Gift: A Memoir of a Pastor’s Calling to Defy the Church’s Persecution of Lesbians and Gays.  Additional readings will be assigned from the library and Internet.

ETLA 401 This course explores Christian involvement in five contemporary social justice movements: 1. Latin American Liberation Theology and its answers to institutional violence, oppression, and poverty; 2. Christian Environmentalism and its answers to pollution, desertification, and other ecological      problems; land tenure and the control and stewardship of other natural resources; diminishing resources and increasing populations; animal rights; global warming; energy lobbies; sustainable economies; etc.; 3. Black Liberation and Christians’ sometimes glorious sometimes disappointing opposition to classism, slavery, bigotry, and racism; 4. Christian participation in (and opposition to) the Women’s Rights Movement; and 5. Christian participation in (and opposition to) the lesbian gay transgender      community.

MOODLE.  Students enrolled in ETLA 401 should visit Moodle for the course syllabus, assignments, review materials, and discussions.  For general information about Moodle, how it works, the site’s structure and pedagogical philosophy, visit Moodle’s homepage.  For on-campus support, contact Emory & Henry College’s Information Technology Help Desk at 276.944.6881.

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RELG 352.  Jesus, Spring 2012 semester, TTH 1:30 p.m.

Texts for the course are a copy of the Bible; Ron Cameron’s (ed.) The Other Gospels:  Non-Canonical Gospel Texts; James M. Dawsey’s Peter’s Last Sermon:  Identity and Discipleship in the Gospel of Mark; James D. G. Dunn’s The Evidence for Jesus; Nikos Kazantzakis, The Last Temptation of Christ; and C.S. Lewis’s The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe.  The texts are available in the Emory & Henry College bookstore and may also be ordered online at Amazon.com.  

RELG 352 explores historical, literary, and artistic portrayals of Jesus down through the centuries.  While examining some of the rich diversity of literary and artistic conceptions of Jesus’ nature and meaning, the course also strives to maintain the integrity of the historicity of Jesus’ life.

The course is divided into three parts.  In the first part, we will explore some of the early literature about Jesus.  Readings will include the four canonical gospels, “The Coptic Gospel of Thomas,” “The Infancy Gospel of Thomas,” “The Acts of Pilate,” “The Kerygma of Peter,” etc.  We will also read appropriate portions from Tacitus, Suetonius, and Josephus, and survey examples of early Christian art.

In the second part of the course, we will take up the question “What can be said historically about Jesus?”  Primary readings will be Dunn’s and Dawsey’s books listed in the syllabus.  Of great interest are those stories where there is disagreement among the gospel witnesses.  We will examine the evidence for the Shroud of Turin.  And as a critical thinking exercise, we will explore the question of Jesus’ messianic consciousness.

In the third part of the course, we will study some modern interpretations of Jesus.  Readings will include the Kazantzakis and Lewis novels listed in the syllabus.  We will also discuss Dostoyevsky’s “The Grand Inquisitor.”  We will listen to modern Jesus music and view one of the Easter movies about Jesus.

MOODLE.  Students enrolled in RELG 352 should visit Moodle for the course syllabus, assignments, review materials, and discussions.  For general information about Moodle, how it works, the site’s structure and pedagogical philosophy, visit Moodle’s homepage.  For on-campus support, contact Emory & Henry College’s Information Technology Help Desk at 276.944.6881.

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ETLA 101-07.  Foundations 1, Spring 2012 semester, MWF 9:00 a.m

Texts for the course are Joseph T. Reiff and J. Laurence Hare’s, eds., Human Foundations: Some Central Human Questions (third edition); Thomas Cahill’s The Gift of the Jews: How a Tribe of Desert Nomads Changed the Way Everyone Thinks and Feels; and Thomas Cahill’s Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter.  The texts are available in the Emory & Henry College bookstore and Cahill’s books may also be ordered online at Amazon.com.  Although Cahill’s books are available electronically, students should purchase paper copies for this course. 

ETLA 101 seeks to introduce students to the humanities through engagement with key cultural sources from the ancient world, supplemented by additional sources from the medieval and early modern periods.  The course is part of Emory & Henry’s general studies program and serves as a cornerstone of the liberal arts core.  It leads students to explore important historical, religious, philosophical, and artistic texts and to consider the light these texts shine on fundamental human questions.  ETLA 101 emphasizes ethical reasoning skills.  The interdisciplinary nature of the course reflects the diverse academic background and training of Foundations I professors, the range of cultural resources considered, and the multiple perspectives used in grappling with the central human questions posed throughout the semester.

MOODLE.  Students enrolled in ETLA 101-07 should visit Moodle for the course syllabus, assignments, review materials, and discussions.  For general information about Moodle, how it works, the site’s structure and pedagogical philosophy, visit Moodle’s homepage.  For on-campus support, contact Emory & Henry College’s Information Technology Help Desk at 276.944.6881.

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